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Martensville multi-purpose facility feasible, says study

A multi-purpose recreational facility that would include a second indoor ice surface for Martensville is feasible, according to a report presented to Martensville City Council on Tuesday, November 6.

DCG Philanthropic Services Inc. was contracted by council earlier this year to do a feasibility study on whether a multipurpose facility was needed, what it might look like, and the potential cost.

The study concluded that a $12 to $13 million facility is a realistic goal, with the city contributing half the cost and the other half generated through a concerted 18-month public fundraising campaign.

The study also found that while Martensville residents believe such a facility is needed, the majority do not want an increase in property taxes.

City council and administration will now review the report and consider a number of design and cost options for the facility. A decision on whether to proceed with the project, and what it may look like, will come before council at some point in the coming months.

Martensville Mayor Kent Muench said he’s pleased with the findings of the study.

“It confirms that such a facility fits in with our recreation master plan,” said Muench in an interview following the November 6 meeting. “It also found there is capacity in our community to fundraise.”

Muench noted the city already has a recreation levy on its tax roll, and funds are currently being set aside in a dedicated reserve for a future facility.

“The city obviously needs to take the lead role,” said Muench. “But we also need to have a core group of people who are really motivated and who get the community engaged. It’s similar to how the skate park was built.”

Jesse Reis, a member of the Martensville Community Recreation Project (MCRP) said having the feasibility study completed is “another step” along a very long road.

“It’s good to have something on the table,” said Reis. “Obviously, city council still has to vote on it, but now they have some options about what it may look like and the potential cost. This is a big step in the right direction for us, but there’s still a lot of work ahead, particularly when it comes to raising the funds.”

Muench said he thinks it’s realistic for the city to earmark about $6.5 million toward the project as a way of kick-starting the community fundraising effort.

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